You just had your wisdom teeth removed. You’re now having bloody noses. Is there a connection?

“Some oozing after wisdom teeth (upper wisdom teeth) removal is to be expected for a few minutes to an hour or two, as the blood from the extraction site could flow through the sinus to the nose,” explains Brijesh Chandwani, DMD, BDS, Diplomate, American Board of Orofacial Pain, with Connecticut & NY TMJ.

This does not mean that something went wrong during the extraction procedure. However:

“If the bleeding from the nose is associated with significant pain or trouble breathing, it could mean something blocking the airways,” says Dr. Chandwani.

“Notify your doctor immediately if you are having pain in the nose or sinuses along with the nosebleeds; it could mean that something may have gotten dislodged in the sinus and irritating the tissues.

“In the presence of a bleeding disorder or high blood pressure, also notify your dentist or oral surgeon immediately.”

Now if this sounds scary, keep in mind that the vast majority of wisdom teeth removals go without a hitch.

You’ll be given instructions on how to take care of the removal areas and what to keep an eye out for. You’ll also be given instructions for dietary restrictions following the extraction.

Other Causes of Nosebleeds — Not Related to Wisdom Teeth Removal

Dry air. See if a humidifier doesn’t help solve the problem.

Picking the nose. This includes sticking objects in the nose in an attempt to clear out crusted mucus. The most common object is probably a Q-tip swab. This definitely can cause a nosebleed – and not necessarily immediately.

The above causes are the most common for a bleeding nose. Below are more causes, listed in no particular order.

Sinus infection, chronic sinusitis or the common cold.

Blood thinner drugs.

Deviated septum (structure in the nose).

Frequent use of nasal sprays.

Drinking.

Pregnancy.

Nasal polyps.

Nasal/sinus tumorsbenign or malignant.

Leukemia.

Dr. Chandwani has 10+ years of experience focusing on TMJ disorders and sleep disorders.
Lorra Garrick has been covering medical, fitness and cybersecurity topics for many years, having written thousands of articles for print magazines and websites, including as a ghostwriter. She’s also a former ACE-certified personal trainer. 

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