An itching nose is a common complaint among CPAP users, but there are ways to prevent this most annoying situation.

CPAP stands for continuous positive airway pressure.

Complying to CPAP use is difficult enough for some sleep apnea patients without the hassle of an itching nose to go along with it.

Repeatedly scratching is not the solution.

“To prevent an itchy nose while using your CPAP, be sure your mask and supplies are replaced and cleaned regularly to prevent bacteria buildup,” says Michael Trufant, Business Development Manager of Aeroflow Industrial Clinic which specializes in providing sleep studies, CPAP treatment options and quality care to sleep apnea patients nationwide.

Trufant adds, “One easy way to keep your mask, hose and reservoir sanitized is to use the SoClean (an automated CPAP cleaner and sanitizer).

“The machine does not require water or any messy chemicals. The SoClean kills 99.9 percent of CPAP bacteria, germs and other pathogens.”

NOTE: SoClean does not make visible deposits of gunk or residue disappear. It is a microbial-cleaning device, not something that scoops up or wipes away clumps of grime.

You will need to do that by hand. Your durable medical equipment provider can show you how.

The SoClean device should be used in addition to the hands-on cleaning protocol that your DME recommends.

But if you don’t regularly clean and sanitize your CPAP device, then it’s more likely to cause an itchy nose.

If despite taking these measures, your nose continues to itch—seemingly being caused by the CPAP mask—you may want to schedule a visit with a dermatologist.

Perhaps a dermatologist could prescribe or recommend some kind of cream or ointment to reduce the propensity of your nose to itch from the CPAP mask.

Remember, it’s not an issue directly with your nose; it’s an issue with the skin.