Now you have more motivation than ever to get rid of your dangerous belly fat: colon cancer. Even if you take other measures to prevent this disease, a big belly is bad news.

A study clearly shows a causal relation between abdominal fat and the development of colon cancer.

Next time you look in a mirror and scowl at your rotund middle, and are then tempted to admonish yourself for being vain, STOP:

Excessive belly fat has been shown to be an independent risk factor for the development of colon cancer.

Belly fat is also known as visceral fat, and when people have this to a pronounced degree, they are often called “apple shapes.”

The March 2013 edition of Cancer Prevention Research has a report on a study from the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, NY.

The paper says there’s a direct link between visceral fat and colon cancer development.

Researchers all along have known there was a link, but didn’t know if the link was due to the behaviors that caused excess abdominal girth (such as a sugary diet), or the actual fat itself.

A mice study shows it’s the actual fat itself that raises colon cancer risk. Though lifestyle habits do play a role in colon cancer risk, this new study “unequivocally demonstrates that visceral adiposity is causally linked to intestinal cancer,” says Derek M. Huffman, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at the IAR.

The study found that obese mice (who were genetically prone to developing colon cancer) who had their belly fat surgically removed or dissipated via calorie restriction, experienced a reduction in the quantity of intestinal tumors.

Keep in mind that when the excess belly adiposity was removed, the mice were still otherwise obese.

  • In female mice, surgical removal of visceral fat was much more linked to reduction in colon tumors when compared to calorie restriction.
  • In male mice, this phenomenon was reversed.

“This suggests that there are important gender differences in how adiposity and nutrients interact with the tumor environment,” says Huffman.

He adds that this study stresses the need to get strategies in place for reducing excess abdominal girth in people.

Though causality between stomach fat and colon cancer has been established by this study, the report also says that the mechanisms behind this have yet to be defined.

But do you really need further sleuthing to know what the next step should be if you have excess stomach fat?

Your next step is to get rid of the big belly.

Do not assume this task is hopeless, no matter how hard you’ve “tried” in the past; no matter how much you may love your beer; no matter how much you think that this “runs in the family” or is inherited somehow.

There are proven workout techniques that will siphon out the dangerous fat in your belly. And no matter how firm or hard your middle seems to the touch—never, ever tell yourself that this is muscle. It is not!

Lorra Garrick is a former personal trainer certified through the American Council on Exercise. At Bally Total Fitness she trained women and men of all ages for fat loss, muscle building, fitness and improved health. 
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Source: sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130306083813.htm