If you’ve recently suffered from a toothache but then it suddenly went away, this can actually mean something potentially serious.

You need to see your dentist promptly.

Don’t assume that the sudden end to a mysterious toothache means you no longer have to worry about the tooth.

“Oftentimes, someone may have a toothache for a period of time due to dental trauma, decay, previous dental work, etc.,” says Marco L. Tironi, DDS, who practices dentistry in Rochester, MI.

“This is usually caused by inflammation of the ‘dental pulp’ or nerve in the tooth,” continues Dr. Tironi.

“This pain can sometimes be alleviated if the offending problems are removed (i.e., decay in close proximity to the nerve is removed).

“Sometimes, however, the nerve in the tooth is ‘too far gone; to repair.

“In this case, the nerve in the tooth will die. This often results in pain subsiding for a short period of time.

“The pain will generally return once bacteria builds up in the dead pulp space and causes an infection around or near the offending tooth.

“It is important to see your dentist ASAP so an accurate diagnosis can be made and the appropriate treatment rendered.”

No Pain May Mean Dead Nerve

If the pain following your mysterious toothache has not returned, and it’s only been a short time since that toothache developed – this could be a time that bacteria are building up in that dead pulp space.

A dead nerve cannot send pain signals to the brain. So while your mouth now feels fine, there can be some bad things brewing.

You certainly do not want an infection that spreads beyond the local space, which is why you should still have a dentist check out the area where the pain was.

A member of the Academy of General Dentistry, Dr. Tironi is trained in sedation dentistry, dental implantology, orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics.